Gull Harbor Fine Art and Craft Show

Last weekend I had a booth at the Gull Harbor Fine Art and Craft Show.  I’ve been doing this show for several years and know most of the returning artists.  As my husband was helping me set up my booth, he remarked that it was like a family reunion, because  we were all glad to see each other again.

My booth

My booth

In addition to hanging out with these great people, I also enjoy this show because all the art is of good quality.  The hand dyed fibers in the booth next to mine made me swoon with color intoxication!

GH 3 GH 4 GH 5 GH 6Other booths offered fairy shoes…

GH 15block printing…GH 7ceramics…

GH 8paintings available as prints, cards and jewelry….

GH 10and metal work jewelry.

GH 9I brought both my jewelry, as well as some of my ceramic components.

IMG_0278_0222GH 20GH 19

Last minute jewelry Gull Harbor

GH23GH 18I enjoyed chatting with return customers and meeting lots of new people. It was a fun weekend, but a whole week has gone by now and I still haven’t unloaded all the booth supplies from my car.  Hmmm, better make that a priority today!

GH 22 aI am always delighted to read your comments! Hope to hear from you.

Linda cursiveLinda Landig Jewelry

El Dia de los Muertos

Happy Day of the Dead!

Several years my husband and I were in Oaxaca, Mexico during the Day of the Dead celebration. And Oaxaca celebrated this holiday in a big way!

Dia de los Muertos was originally an Aztec celebration of the lives of those who had died. The Spanish conquerors tried to put an end to the holiday, but were not successful, (thank goodness). Over time el Dia de los Muertos merged with the Catholic All-Saints day and All-Souls day on November 1st and 2nd. The contemporary celebration melds aspects of Aztec ritual with Christian traditions and contemporary life.

Sugar Skulls and Marigolds

Day of the Dead

Sugar Skulls in Oaxaca

We started seeing sugar skulls in the markets about a week or 2 before the Day of the Dead celebration. Apparently the Catholic friars taught the Mexicans how to make decorations from an ingredient that was abundant and affordable: sugar. Sugar Skulls and other items are often used to decorate the ofrendas on Dia de los Muertos. As in the picture below, marigolds also decorate small home altars like this, as well as large public displays. The bright orange marigolds are said to guide the spirits of the deceased, back to their earthly homes, as they visit their loved ones.

Day of the Dead alter

Oferendas with sugar skulls

Day of the Dead Necklace

I wanted to design a Day of the Dead necklace that would  reflect these traditions, with respect and authenticity. So I started with an awesome, bronze clay sugar skull  by my friend Staci Smith.

DOD Necklace Sugar Skull I needed some beads to represent the marigolds and these were perfect!

Day Of the Dead Necklace with Marigold beads.

Day Of the Dead Necklace with Marigold beads.

I wired a “marigold” beneath the chin of the sugar skull and dangled 7 other from a strand of black, gray and silver “peanut beads”.

Sugar Skull Necklace 3I topped the sugar skull with a dark lilac handmade ceramic bead by Mary Hubbard, of White Clover Kiln and then added a strand of purple, recycled sari silk.

Sugar Skull Necklace 4Here’s some additional information of the Day of the Dead, that you might find interesting:

The Skull Sugar Necklace is available on my website.

I am always delighted to read your comments!   Hope to hear from you.

Linda cursiveLinda Landig Jewelry

Raven Theme – Work In Progress

October’s AJE Component of the Month challenge centered on a raven theme, rather than on a specific component.  Participants were invited to create raven  jewelry or jewelry components.

On the Art Jewelry Elements blog, Karen shared some Native American origin stories and Jenny wrote about Celtic and Norse raven mythology.

RAVENI have had very little time to focus on jewelry this month, as we’ve been busy getting our house ready to put on the market. However, I thought I could at least show you some preliminary drawings.

RAVEN 9Unlike some of my AJE teammates, I have no background in drawing or painting and I’ve only recently begun making a few tentative sketches.  My 1st idea was to keep things simple and just draw a raven feather that I could translate into a pendant.  Even though you’d think a feather would be easy to draw, it took me quite a long time to get the shape and proportions to my liking.  I think this will transfer well into clay.  I have some ideas for patterns to go inside the feather outline.  Can’t wait to carve out some time, so I can get my hands back into clay.

I got to see one of Caroline’s initial raven drawings and Jennifer has been privately sharing some of her drawings from a college class she has been taking this semester.  They inspired me to try drawing a raven head.  Three labored attempts landed in the trash before the drawing you see below.  And I can’t even begin to tell you how many times I erased portions of this picture, because I couldn’t get the proportions right.  This was several hours of work.  Obviously this does not come naturally to me.  But I’m all about stretching beyond your comfort zone.  Karen helped me see that this guy needs a bit more structure at the top of the head, especially at the juncture with the beak.  But overall I’m pretty happy with him – I surprised myself!  I have no plans to make this raven head into a pendant.  I just challenged myself to try drawing this for the fun of it.  I do plan to make use of the feather, though.

RAVEN 8aAlthough I have a raven pendant from Jenny Davies-Reazor, I ran out of time to design a necklace with it.  I will, however, share a finished necklace that is already in my shop and just waiting to fly home with someone.

Blue Raven Necklace

Blue Raven Necklace 3Blue Raven Necklace 2This is a blog hop!  So head on over to Art Jewelry Elements to get links to all the other participants.  I can’t wait to see what everyone has made!

And by the way-


I am always delighted to read your comments!   Hope to hear from you.

Linda cursiveLinda Landig Jewelry

Rustic Stoneware Coin Pendant Reveal

August AJE Component of the Month Reveal

Our August Component of the Month was created by Diana Ptaszynski of Suburban Girl Studio.  I had the pleasure of spending several days with Diana and her husband, Colin, prior to Bead Fest, last week.  (More about that in another post.)

Rustic stoneware coin pendants by Diana P.

This has been a crazy, busy month for me, so this will be a work in progress post.  I have enough of the necklace finished, that you can pretty much picture how it will look when completed.

COM 1bUsing waxed linen, I knotted on Diana’s stoneware pendant.  Then I knotted one of Lesley Watt’s stoneware beads above the pendant. I love the rustic textures in both Diana’s and Lesley’s pieces.  They look great together.

COM 5To the right, I knotted on a patina’ed copper bead by Miss Fickle Media, a stoneware bead by Mary Hubbard and another stoneware bead, whose creator I don’t remember.  To the left are a matte finished tigereye stone bead, a ceramic tube bead by Karen Totten and 2 of Diana’s beads.

COM 3The back will will be some combination of the wood and glass peanut beads that I picked up at Bead Fest.  I’m pleased with how this is turning out and look forward to completing it.  I’ll let you know when it is in my shop.

COM 1aThank you, Diana, for sharing your stoneware coin pendant with us!  Want to see what everyone else made with Diane’s pendant?  Here are the links!

AJE Team

I am always delighted to read your comments!   Hope to hear from you.

Linda cursiveLinda Landig Jewelry

July Component Of The Month Reveal

This month’s  Component Of The Month was made by Art Jewelry Elements (AJE) team member Niky Sayers.  Niky, who is from London, England, used 2 old farthing coins to make a very cool bead.  I didn’t know how much a farthing was worth or when it had been in use, so I looked it up.  A farthing was worth a quarter of an old penny and there were also half farthings and 3 quarter farthings.  They were taken out of circulation in 1961.

Farthing Bracelet 3I knew that I wanted to make a multi-strand bracelet with my farthing bead.  I thought this raku bead, from Odd Designs, would add some color while also tying in with the coppery color of the coin.  At that point I decided to go for blue and coppery brown in the whole bracelet, along with some smaller spots accent colors.

Farthing Bracelet 2The blue lampwork glass bead (above, right) by Jen Cameron of Glass Addictions was perfect for my third focal bead.

Farthing Bracelet 1Each of the three strands of smaller beads has a mix of blue and brown glass beads, with some accent colors and some small copper heshe..  Although each strand is different, they all have some blue glass seed beads with a copper sheen and some of the copper heshe.  These common components help  to tie the overall design together. Farthing Bracelet 5I  finished the bracelet with a handmade ceramic button by Karen Totten of Starry Road Studio.

Farthing Bracelet 4Thank you Niky for sharing your awesome metalsmithing skills with us in the form of this uber-cool bead!  In addition to the AJE team members, 3 lucky guest artists also received farthing beads. My Farthing Bracelet is available in the bracelet section of my shop.

Check out the blogs listed below to see what everyone else made with their farthings.

Guest Artists

I am always delighted to read your comments!   Hope to hear from you.!

Linda cursiveLinda Landig Jewelry

Pretty Palettes Reveal

unknown photographer, creative commons

Erin Prais-Hintz invited me to be her partner for her July Pretty Palettes challenge on the Halcraft Inspiration Blog.  July’s inspirational theme is aurora borealis.  As her partner, I received all these amazing beads from Halcraft. It would be hard not to be inspired by all this metallic sheen and sparkle.  These are perfect beads for the aurora borealis theme!

Pretty Palettes BeadsHere’s a close-up that really shows off the metallic sheen.

Pretty Palettes 2If you look above the pendant in both of these pictures, you’ll see two round, blue-gray glass beads.  There was a whole strand of those in the package from Erin, but in my rush to design with them, I forgot to take a photograph of all the beads before I started.

Shine On Necklace

For my first piece, I made a fringe necklace.  Now you see where all those blue-gray beads went!  It’s a little hard to see in a photograph, but the blue-gray beads have a kind of inner gleam that reminds me of labradorite. I paired them with matte, metallic dagger beads, silver lined blue seed beads and Swarovski crystals.

Shine On Necklace

The multiple colors of the dagger beads brings to mind the many colors that fill the sky during an aurora borealis.  You can find the Shine On Necklace on my website.

Shine On Necklace

While I was learning a bit more about aurora borealis, I discovered that at times it can take the form of a spiral, as in the picture below.  Isn’t that just amazing?

unknown photographer, creative commons

For these earrings, I wanted to express that spiral in the sky.  I used a pair of spiral ceramic charms that I made and combined them with a few of each type of the metallic Halcraft beads.

Aurora Borealis Earrings

Aurora Borealis Earrings

I used a glaze on the ceramic components that breaks into several shades of a black cherry color.  I love how that mimics that naturally occurring ombre shades of the aurora borealis.  The Aurora Borealis Earrings are available on my website.

Aurora Borealis Earrings

Aurora Borealis Earrings

I have more ideas for these beads swirling around in my head, but I’ve run out of time.  I would like to thank Erin and Halcraft for inviting me to play along.  It was lots of fun.

Now I recommend that you hop on over to the Halcraft blog to see what Erin made with these beads and to get links to the other participants.  Happy blog hopping!

Update:  I just found some info on an aurora borealis that some people may be able to see at the end of this month.  Follow this link for more information.

Linda cursiveLinda Landig Jewelry

Aurora Borealis

This month I am excited to be Erin Prais-Hintz’s Pretty Palettes partner.  Pretty Palettes is a monthly challenge that Erin hosts on the Halcraft Inspiration blog. Halcraft is a company that produces several different lines of beads for various retailers. Their Bead Gallery® line is made exclusively for Michaels. Each month Erin chooses a theme and selects Halcraft beads inspired by that month’s theme.  July’s theme is Aurora Borealis.

Photo by Julien Ratel ( Júllí Jónsson ) Creative Commons

Erin also chooses someone to partner with her each month.  As her July partner I received this fabulous set of Bead Gallery beads and the pendant.  Its hard to catch the shimmer and shine of these beads in a photograph.  They are super inspiring!  Others can play along with this challenge as well.  They can purchase these beads if they want and/or use beads from their stash.  My designs will be a combination of the Halcraft beads and coordinating beads from my stash.

So far I’ve made one item and I’m working on more. I can’t show you what I’ve made until the reveal date, which is July 29th.  But I will say that I have used almost the whole strand of beads that is on the far right in the photo above and I love how it turned out!  I hope you will come back on the 29th for the Pretty Palettes reveal!Linda cursiveLinda Landig Jewelry