Art Elements COM

This month I’m playing along with Art Elements Component of the Month challenge. The super talented Lindsay Starr, created these innovative leather cabochons. To learn how she made these, you can read about her process here.  The cabochon I received is the second from the left, in the top photo.

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This was an interesting challenge for me, because I’m not a seed beader, so I couldn’t create a beaded bezel.  Upon further reflection, I realized that I could use some techniques that I learned in a pine needle basketry course that I took about a year ago.

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As you can see, the center of my basket is a stone cabochon.  My idea was to use Lindsay’s leather cab in a similar manner, but only weave two rows of pine needles around it and then use it as a brooch or pendant.  I glued a sturdy fabric to the back of the cab and prepared my pine needles.

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Using dark green Irish waxed linen, I added the two rows of pine needles.   In the photo below, the second row is close to being finished.  I laid the cab on our glass coffee table and started playing with some different possible embellishments.  When I found a combination I liked, I trimmed the remaining pine needles to a tapered point and wove them in.

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I used Fire Line to add the flowers and leaves.  I haven’t added any findings yet, as I haven’t decided if this should be a brooch or a pendant.  What do you think?

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I’d position the cab sideways, as above, for a brooch.  If I were to make it into a pendant, I’d position it vertically.

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A big thank you to Lindsay for sharing the leather cabochons with us. I also want to thank each of you for visiting my blog.  Now hop on over to the all the other participants and see all the fantastic things that everyone has created.

Guests:

Niky

I am always delighted to read your comments!  Hope to hear from you.

Linda cursiveLinda Landig Jewelry

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Component Of The Month Reveal – Doubled

Caroline Dewison, of Blueberri Beads, was our component hostess this month. Everyone received one of these unique and awesome lichen components.

I love how Caroline’s lichen have little cup shapes. This photo shows some similarly shaped lichen, that I saw during a walk, with my husband on the beach.

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And here’s the lichen necklace, that I designed with Caroline’s pendant.

Lichen Necklace 5

The green is quite intense, so I wanted a neutral background color, where the eyes could rest.  So I picked up the gray background in the pendant and added gray wooden cubes, 3 gray polymer rounds and some gray titanium hematite tubes that I picked up at Bead Fest last August. A rounded triangular polymer clay bead by Staci Louise Originals in black and straw-brown furthers the muted tones.

Lichen Necklace

I highlighted the green, with a great, textured ceramic tube bead by White Clover Kiln.  I also used some green pearls, 2 green rubber rings and fun, green pellet beads.

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I had some glass druk beads from Bead Fest that are the exact teal-turquoise color as the center of the lichen “cups”.  So I added 3 of those to accent the lichen centers.

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To find out more about this necklace or to make a purchase, go to Linda Landig Jewelry

And here’s why the title of this post says that the Reveal is doubled.  When we had the August COM Reveal, I could only show a work-in-progress photo of the necklace I was making with Diana’s pendant.  Well, it’s finally done,  so I’m sharing the finished necklace now!

Forest Refuge Necklace 2

In addition to the pendant, the turquoise, ceramic round bead was also made by Diana.  Artisan ceramic beads by Karen Totten of Starry Road and Gaea are also included in this necklace.  The beads are strung on Irish waxed linen and the chain is upcycled from an old purse of mine.   This necklace is now available in my shop.

Forest Refuge Necklace 4

I want to thank Caroline for sharing her lichen pendants with us.  It was a delight to work with.

This is a blog hop and I encourage you to visit the blogs listed below to see what the other participants have made with Caroline’s stunning pendants.

Guest Artists

I am always delighted to read your comments!   Hope to hear from you.

Linda cursiveLinda Landig Jewelry

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July Component Of The Month Reveal

This month’s  Component Of The Month was made by Art Jewelry Elements (AJE) team member Niky Sayers.  Niky, who is from London, England, used 2 old farthing coins to make a very cool bead.  I didn’t know how much a farthing was worth or when it had been in use, so I looked it up.  A farthing was worth a quarter of an old penny and there were also half farthings and 3 quarter farthings.  They were taken out of circulation in 1961.

Farthing Bracelet 3I knew that I wanted to make a multi-strand bracelet with my farthing bead.  I thought this raku bead, from Odd Designs, would add some color while also tying in with the coppery color of the coin.  At that point I decided to go for blue and coppery brown in the whole bracelet, along with some smaller spots accent colors.

Farthing Bracelet 2The blue lampwork glass bead (above, right) by Jen Cameron of Glass Addictions was perfect for my third focal bead.

Farthing Bracelet 1Each of the three strands of smaller beads has a mix of blue and brown glass beads, with some accent colors and some small copper heshe..  Although each strand is different, they all have some blue glass seed beads with a copper sheen and some of the copper heshe.  These common components help  to tie the overall design together. Farthing Bracelet 5I  finished the bracelet with a handmade ceramic button by Karen Totten of Starry Road Studio.

Farthing Bracelet 4Thank you Niky for sharing your awesome metalsmithing skills with us in the form of this uber-cool bead!  In addition to the AJE team members, 3 lucky guest artists also received farthing beads. My Farthing Bracelet is available in the bracelet section of my shop.

Check out the blogs listed below to see what everyone else made with their farthings.

Guest Artists

I am always delighted to read your comments!   Hope to hear from you.!

Linda cursiveLinda Landig Jewelry

We’re All Ears :: June Tide Pools Challenge

Growing up near the Pacific coast, my fascination with tide pools dates back to childhood vacations on the ocean.  There is an entire ecosystem in each little puddle and pool.

Sea stars, anemomes, mussels and barnacles share habitat on Rialto Beach. Photo by Halfcenturyhiker.

Sea stars (aka starfish) usually have 5 arms, but sometimes we’d find sea stars with a many more arms than that.

The many colored sea anemones look like strange plants, but are actually animals that attach themselves to rocks and shells.  They wave their tentacles when the tide is in and close up when the tide is out.  If you accidentally step on one, it will squirt water!

Tide pools are also home to shellfish, such as mussels, limpets and barnacles.  Any kid who has ever clambered around on rocky tide pools in flip flops can tell you how viciously a barnacle can cut your foot, if you slip on some slick seaweed!

I can not imagine living far from the sea.  It’s where I go when I need council, comfort or serenity.

Which it to say that I love this month’s Earrings Everyday Tide Pools theme.  The earrings I made would be great to wear at the beach.  But I know that I’d wear them lots of other times, just to bring a bit of the beach into my everyday life.

The beautiful blue lampwork beads are handmade by Sue Kennedy of Sue Beads.  There is a lovely trailing of fine silver around these beads, which accents the sterling silver starfish that I dangled below them.

The Silver Starfish Earrings are available in my shop: Linda Landig Jewelry.  To see my entire Surf and Sand Collection go here:  Surf and Sand Collection

This is a blog hop.  To see everyone else’s tide pool inspired earrings, head over to Earrings Everyday, to get the links.

Linda

Linda Landig Jewelry

AJE Component Of The Month Challenge – May 2015

Iris Bracelet

This month’s components are beautiful beaded beads by Sue Kennedy of Sue Beads.  I love her beaded beads and her color choices!

Sue’s beaded beads are an obvious choice for earrings, but this time I decided to switch it up a bit and make a bracelet.

Iris Bouquet Bracelet 1I paired Sue’s bead with a lampwork bead by my friends at Beads and Botanicals. and a pretty matte bead with light blue stripes.

Iris Bouquet Bracelet 2I enjoy making bracelets that go from one strand to multi-strands and that was my approach here.  When I started my Facebook Destash Group several weeks ago, I realized that I’d been neglecting my gemstone collection, so I chose some amethysts and pearls for the for the first two strands.

Iris Bouquet Bracelet 5Although I rarely use Swarovski crystals any more, they were exactly what this bracelet called for in the third strand.

While I like each strand to be different, I try to tie them all together with some repeating components, in this case, I have light purple seed beads and small, blue cubes in every strand.

At this point, I knew that my usual brass or copper clasps were not going to work at all for this bracelet.  Instead I selected a beautiful, hammer textured sterling silver toggle clasp. Ooo, so lovely!

Iris Bouquet Bracelet 3When I was a kid, I had a little garden plot where I grew purple irises.  They made me happy and so does this “Iris Bracelet“.

Check out my new life-sized wrist model!  This is her début!  Does she help you picture how the bracelet would look on you?  I hope so.

Iris Bouquet Bracelet 6The Iris Bracelet is available on my website.

The Component of the Month Challenge is a blog hop. Enjoy all the eye candy by visiting the links below.

Guests
AJE Team
Susan Kennedy – Hostess

Snowflake Necklace

AJE Component of the Month Reveal

Once a month Art Jewelry Elements (AJE) hosts a component giveaway and jewelry reveal.  December’s component was made by Diana Ptaszynski of Suburban Girl Studio.  Members of the Art Jewelry Elements team, plus a few  lucky guest artists were given one of these awesome ceramic snowflake pendants to design with.  Today we get to see what everyone created!

Ceramic Snowflake Pendants by Suburban Girl Studio

I received one of the turquoise snowflakes to work with.  I decided to highlight the triangular shaped points of the snowflakes, by using some bicone shaped beads and by creating a triangular shaped clasp.

Diana's COM 3The triangular link is based on a link from Cindy Wimmer‘s book The Missing Link.  I used a bit lighter gauge wire and made it a bit smaller, so it wouldn’t overwhelm Diana’s pendant.  Then I used the same basic idea, but created a hook on one end, so I could use it as a clasp.

Diana's COM 2The beads are strung on walnut colored Irish waxed linen.  The beautiful batiked ribbon wrapped a bead order I got from Karen Totten of Starry Road Studio.  It has some turquoise in it, along with shades of blue, black and green.  So pretty and it was a perfect finishing touch for my necklace.

Diana's COM 1Thank you Diana for sharing your pendants with us! Visit Suburban Girl Studio to see more of Diana’s work!

Diana's COM 5Want to see more gorgeous  jewelry with Diana’s snowflake pendants?  Click on the links below to see what the other participants created.   Have fun!

Guest Artists
 
AJE Blog Team

I am always delighted to read your comments!   Hope to hear from you.

-Linda

Linda Landig Jewelry

Blue Raven Necklace

AJE Component Of The Month Reveal – November 2014

Our November component comes to us from Kristen Stevens of Beadwork By KAS. Kristen does amazing things with tiny beads, including these wonderful beaded links.

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Beaded Links by Kristen Stevens

Here is the pair I chose for this month’s challenge:

Beded links in dark blue

Terra Pearl Blue Beaded Links

This is actually the second time I have used Kristen links in this color, but I was delighted to give it a go another time!  I made these earrings a couple of months ago and they are available in my shop.

Montana Blue Earrings with Beadwork Hoops and Swarovski Crystals Handmade. OOAK

Montana Blues Earrings

.I purposely picked the same color this month, because I really love it!  However, I didn’t want to make earrings again.  I had this necklace started on my work table.  I liked the front part of it, that you can see below, but I was dissatisfied with the back of the necklace. The blue raven pendant is by Oh! Sullivan Studio, the handmade ceramic beads are from Gaea and White Clover Kiln.  There are also some recycled glass beads and various other goodies that are all knotted on Irish waxed linen.

Blue Raven Necklace 3 cropped, lightenedWhen I saw the unfinished Blue Raven Necklace sitting on my table this week, I realized that Kristen’s beaded links would make a perfect transitional point from a beaded section of the necklace to chain in the back, and the colors were perfect.  I love serendipity like that!  So here’s my transformed necklace.  I love it now!

Blue Raven Necklace 1

Blue Raven Necklace 2Due to Thanksgiving busyness and holiday jewelry show preparations, I haven’t had time to add the Blue Raven Necklace to my shop yet.  But just leave a comment below or message me if you think you might be interested and I’ll fill you in on the details.

Blue Raven Necklace 5This is a blog hop, so I encourage you to check out what all the participants did with Kristen’s awesome beaded links.

Guest Artists

Cindy Martin Shaw
Shai Williams
Karen Martinez

AJE Team Members

Susan Kennedy 
Linda Landig
LesleyWatt
MelissaMeman
Caroline Dewison
Francesca Watson
Jenny Davies-Reazor
Lindsay Starr
Jennifer Cameron

I am always delighted to read your comments!   Hope to hear from you.

-Linda

Linda Landig Jewelry