Art Elements Component of the Month Reveal

Niky Sayers makes the most delightful clasps out of old coins. I’ve designed jewelry with her clasps before and was excited to throw my name in the hat to win one of her hare clasps this month.

Rabbit Clasp COM 1d.jpg

I am always inspired by autumn colors and textures.  It’s easy to picture hares hopping through fallen leaves while scoping out safe burrows for their winter retreats, (although, do hares only live in drier regions? Hmmm, I may have to look into that… )

ea46089b980127869abf8a3272268a75--autumn-fall-autumn-leaves

And that’s how the idea for this bracelet came to be.  I paired one of my ceramic leaf bracelet focals with Niky’s hare clasp and accented it with earthy, fall colors.

The bracelet went through two iterations.   Version 1 is shown below.  Originally I wanted the clasp near the front, hoping it would be more in the spotlight there. I was pleased with version 1 initially.  I took all the bracelet photos for this blog post and went about the rest of my day, wearing my new bracelet.

Rabbit Clasp COM Version 1.jpg

However, the more I wore it, the less I liked it.  It was too bulky and it didn’t drape gracefully on my wrist. It just looked stiff and chunky.

Should I start over, including re-doing all the photos?  Yup, it just wasn’t right and I knew that I would always feel uneasy about it, if I left it as version 1.

Rabbit Clasp COM 2.jpg

Enter Version 2.  Much better.  Some of the bulk in the front was reduced by moving the clasp to the back of the bracelet. I also replaced the bulky and awkward tip drilled pearls, with a double strand of smaller “peanut” beads.

Rabbit Clasp COM 3.jpg

Now there is a focus of interest in both the front and the back. The bracelet curves to the shape of the wrist, rather than standing out at stiff angles.  I’ve said this before, but I think that creating jewelry is like writing an essay.  First you free-write to express all your ideas. Then you go back and do the painstaking work of editing it down to the down to the crystallized essence of your vision.  I hope you can see that process at work here.

Rabbit Clasp COM 4a.jpg

Many thanks to Niky for the opportunity to design with her awesome clasp.  And thanks, also, to my friends at Art Elements for hosting this giveaway and blog hop.

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Now please visit all the participants in this blog hop, to see how they have used Niky’s clasp in their own unique designs.

Guest Designers

Linda Landig

Kathy Lindemer

Divya N

Art Element Team

Claire Fabian

Jenny Davies-Reazor

Cathy Spivey Mendola

Susan Kennedy

Caroline Dewison

Lesley Watt

Diana Ptaszynski

Lindsay Starr

Laney Mead

Niky Sayers

Linda cursive

Linda Landig Jewelry

Art Elements COM

This month I’m playing along with Art Elements Component of the Month challenge. The super talented Lindsay Starr, created these innovative leather cabochons. To learn how she made these, you can read about her process here.  The cabochon I received is the second from the left, in the top photo.

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This was an interesting challenge for me, because I’m not a seed beader, so I couldn’t create a beaded bezel.  Upon further reflection, I realized that I could use some techniques that I learned in a pine needle basketry course that I took about a year ago.

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As you can see, the center of my basket is a stone cabochon.  My idea was to use Lindsay’s leather cab in a similar manner, but only weave two rows of pine needles around it and then use it as a brooch or pendant.  I glued a sturdy fabric to the back of the cab and prepared my pine needles.

com-brooch-2a

Using dark green Irish waxed linen, I added the two rows of pine needles.   In the photo below, the second row is close to being finished.  I laid the cab on our glass coffee table and started playing with some different possible embellishments.  When I found a combination I liked, I trimmed the remaining pine needles to a tapered point and wove them in.

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I used Fire Line to add the flowers and leaves.  I haven’t added any findings yet, as I haven’t decided if this should be a brooch or a pendant.  What do you think?

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I’d position the cab sideways, as above, for a brooch.  If I were to make it into a pendant, I’d position it vertically.

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A big thank you to Lindsay for sharing the leather cabochons with us. I also want to thank each of you for visiting my blog.  Now hop on over to the all the other participants and see all the fantastic things that everyone has created.

Guests:

Niky

I am always delighted to read your comments!  Hope to hear from you.

Linda cursiveLinda Landig Jewelry

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Component Of The Month Reveal – Doubled

Caroline Dewison, of Blueberri Beads, was our component hostess this month. Everyone received one of these unique and awesome lichen components.

I love how Caroline’s lichen have little cup shapes. This photo shows some similarly shaped lichen, that I saw during a walk, with my husband on the beach.

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And here’s the lichen necklace, that I designed with Caroline’s pendant.

Lichen Necklace 5

The green is quite intense, so I wanted a neutral background color, where the eyes could rest.  So I picked up the gray background in the pendant and added gray wooden cubes, 3 gray polymer rounds and some gray titanium hematite tubes that I picked up at Bead Fest last August. A rounded triangular polymer clay bead by Staci Louise Originals in black and straw-brown furthers the muted tones.

Lichen Necklace

I highlighted the green, with a great, textured ceramic tube bead by White Clover Kiln.  I also used some green pearls, 2 green rubber rings and fun, green pellet beads.

Lichen Necklace 4a

I had some glass druk beads from Bead Fest that are the exact teal-turquoise color as the center of the lichen “cups”.  So I added 3 of those to accent the lichen centers.

Lichen Necklace 6

To find out more about this necklace or to make a purchase, go to Linda Landig Jewelry

And here’s why the title of this post says that the Reveal is doubled.  When we had the August COM Reveal, I could only show a work-in-progress photo of the necklace I was making with Diana’s pendant.  Well, it’s finally done,  so I’m sharing the finished necklace now!

Forest Refuge Necklace 2

In addition to the pendant, the turquoise, ceramic round bead was also made by Diana.  Artisan ceramic beads by Karen Totten of Starry Road and Gaea are also included in this necklace.  The beads are strung on Irish waxed linen and the chain is upcycled from an old purse of mine.   This necklace is now available in my shop.

Forest Refuge Necklace 4

I want to thank Caroline for sharing her lichen pendants with us.  It was a delight to work with.

This is a blog hop and I encourage you to visit the blogs listed below to see what the other participants have made with Caroline’s stunning pendants.

Guest Artists

I am always delighted to read your comments!   Hope to hear from you.

Linda cursiveLinda Landig Jewelry

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Oak Leaf And Acorn Necklace

AJE Component Of The Month Reveal

I hosted the September Component of the Month on the Art Jewelry Elements blog. Each of the participants received one of the pendants below.

COM PendantsAfter distributing the pendants, I got the idea to make some with 3 loops, rather than two.  My design features one of the new three loop pendants.

COM 1aUsing Irish waxed linen I dangled a pewter squirrel, by Green Girl Studio from the bottom loop.  At the front of the necklace,  I knotted mossy green glass, wood, recycled glass and trade beads, on orange leather cording.  The back is a simple pattern of seed beads.

COM 3aI have one 2-loop oak leaf pendant in my shop now and will be adding a few more 2 and 3 loop pendants later this afternoon or early evening.

I want to thank everyone who participated in this month’s COM.  To see everyone’s creations, follow these links!

AJE Team

I am always delighted to read your comments!   Hope to hear from you.

Linda cursiveLinda Landig Jewelry

July Component Of The Month Reveal

This month’s  Component Of The Month was made by Art Jewelry Elements (AJE) team member Niky Sayers.  Niky, who is from London, England, used 2 old farthing coins to make a very cool bead.  I didn’t know how much a farthing was worth or when it had been in use, so I looked it up.  A farthing was worth a quarter of an old penny and there were also half farthings and 3 quarter farthings.  They were taken out of circulation in 1961.

Farthing Bracelet 3I knew that I wanted to make a multi-strand bracelet with my farthing bead.  I thought this raku bead, from Odd Designs, would add some color while also tying in with the coppery color of the coin.  At that point I decided to go for blue and coppery brown in the whole bracelet, along with some smaller spots accent colors.

Farthing Bracelet 2The blue lampwork glass bead (above, right) by Jen Cameron of Glass Addictions was perfect for my third focal bead.

Farthing Bracelet 1Each of the three strands of smaller beads has a mix of blue and brown glass beads, with some accent colors and some small copper heshe..  Although each strand is different, they all have some blue glass seed beads with a copper sheen and some of the copper heshe.  These common components help  to tie the overall design together. Farthing Bracelet 5I  finished the bracelet with a handmade ceramic button by Karen Totten of Starry Road Studio.

Farthing Bracelet 4Thank you Niky for sharing your awesome metalsmithing skills with us in the form of this uber-cool bead!  In addition to the AJE team members, 3 lucky guest artists also received farthing beads. My Farthing Bracelet is available in the bracelet section of my shop.

Check out the blogs listed below to see what everyone else made with their farthings.

Guest Artists

I am always delighted to read your comments!   Hope to hear from you.!

Linda cursiveLinda Landig Jewelry

AJE Component Of The Month Challenge – May 2015

Iris Bracelet

This month’s components are beautiful beaded beads by Sue Kennedy of Sue Beads.  I love her beaded beads and her color choices!

Sue’s beaded beads are an obvious choice for earrings, but this time I decided to switch it up a bit and make a bracelet.

Iris Bouquet Bracelet 1I paired Sue’s bead with a lampwork bead by my friends at Beads and Botanicals. and a pretty matte bead with light blue stripes.

Iris Bouquet Bracelet 2I enjoy making bracelets that go from one strand to multi-strands and that was my approach here.  When I started my Facebook Destash Group several weeks ago, I realized that I’d been neglecting my gemstone collection, so I chose some amethysts and pearls for the for the first two strands.

Iris Bouquet Bracelet 5Although I rarely use Swarovski crystals any more, they were exactly what this bracelet called for in the third strand.

While I like each strand to be different, I try to tie them all together with some repeating components, in this case, I have light purple seed beads and small, blue cubes in every strand.

At this point, I knew that my usual brass or copper clasps were not going to work at all for this bracelet.  Instead I selected a beautiful, hammer textured sterling silver toggle clasp. Ooo, so lovely!

Iris Bouquet Bracelet 3When I was a kid, I had a little garden plot where I grew purple irises.  They made me happy and so does this “Iris Bracelet“.

Check out my new life-sized wrist model!  This is her début!  Does she help you picture how the bracelet would look on you?  I hope so.

Iris Bouquet Bracelet 6The Iris Bracelet is available on my website.

The Component of the Month Challenge is a blog hop. Enjoy all the eye candy by visiting the links below.

Guests
AJE Team
Susan Kennedy – Hostess

Snowflake Necklace

AJE Component of the Month Reveal

Once a month Art Jewelry Elements (AJE) hosts a component giveaway and jewelry reveal.  December’s component was made by Diana Ptaszynski of Suburban Girl Studio.  Members of the Art Jewelry Elements team, plus a few  lucky guest artists were given one of these awesome ceramic snowflake pendants to design with.  Today we get to see what everyone created!

Ceramic Snowflake Pendants by Suburban Girl Studio

I received one of the turquoise snowflakes to work with.  I decided to highlight the triangular shaped points of the snowflakes, by using some bicone shaped beads and by creating a triangular shaped clasp.

Diana's COM 3The triangular link is based on a link from Cindy Wimmer‘s book The Missing Link.  I used a bit lighter gauge wire and made it a bit smaller, so it wouldn’t overwhelm Diana’s pendant.  Then I used the same basic idea, but created a hook on one end, so I could use it as a clasp.

Diana's COM 2The beads are strung on walnut colored Irish waxed linen.  The beautiful batiked ribbon wrapped a bead order I got from Karen Totten of Starry Road Studio.  It has some turquoise in it, along with shades of blue, black and green.  So pretty and it was a perfect finishing touch for my necklace.

Diana's COM 1Thank you Diana for sharing your pendants with us! Visit Suburban Girl Studio to see more of Diana’s work!

Diana's COM 5Want to see more gorgeous  jewelry with Diana’s snowflake pendants?  Click on the links below to see what the other participants created.   Have fun!

Guest Artists
 
AJE Blog Team

I am always delighted to read your comments!   Hope to hear from you.

-Linda

Linda Landig Jewelry

Blue Raven Necklace

AJE Component Of The Month Reveal – November 2014

Our November component comes to us from Kristen Stevens of Beadwork By KAS. Kristen does amazing things with tiny beads, including these wonderful beaded links.

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Beaded Links by Kristen Stevens

Here is the pair I chose for this month’s challenge:

Beded links in dark blue

Terra Pearl Blue Beaded Links

This is actually the second time I have used Kristen links in this color, but I was delighted to give it a go another time!  I made these earrings a couple of months ago and they are available in my shop.

Montana Blue Earrings with Beadwork Hoops and Swarovski Crystals Handmade. OOAK

Montana Blues Earrings

.I purposely picked the same color this month, because I really love it!  However, I didn’t want to make earrings again.  I had this necklace started on my work table.  I liked the front part of it, that you can see below, but I was dissatisfied with the back of the necklace. The blue raven pendant is by Oh! Sullivan Studio, the handmade ceramic beads are from Gaea and White Clover Kiln.  There are also some recycled glass beads and various other goodies that are all knotted on Irish waxed linen.

Blue Raven Necklace 3 cropped, lightenedWhen I saw the unfinished Blue Raven Necklace sitting on my table this week, I realized that Kristen’s beaded links would make a perfect transitional point from a beaded section of the necklace to chain in the back, and the colors were perfect.  I love serendipity like that!  So here’s my transformed necklace.  I love it now!

Blue Raven Necklace 1

Blue Raven Necklace 2Due to Thanksgiving busyness and holiday jewelry show preparations, I haven’t had time to add the Blue Raven Necklace to my shop yet.  But just leave a comment below or message me if you think you might be interested and I’ll fill you in on the details.

Blue Raven Necklace 5This is a blog hop, so I encourage you to check out what all the participants did with Kristen’s awesome beaded links.

Guest Artists

Cindy Martin Shaw
Shai Williams
Karen Martinez

AJE Team Members

Susan Kennedy 
Linda Landig
LesleyWatt
MelissaMeman
Caroline Dewison
Francesca Watson
Jenny Davies-Reazor
Lindsay Starr
Jennifer Cameron

I am always delighted to read your comments!   Hope to hear from you.

-Linda

Linda Landig Jewelry

Courage Necklace

AJE Component of the Month Reveal

Once a month Art Jewelry Elements (AJE) hosts a component giveaway and jewelry reveal.  January’s component was made Jenny Davies-Reazor.  Members of the Art Jewelry Elements team, plus a few  lucky guest artists were given a personalized polymer clay and resin focal that Jenny made for us.  Since these components were made at the start of the new year, Jenny chose words to guide us on our journey through 2014.  My word was “Courage”.  I need courage to try new jewelry techniques without being too self-critical about the outcome during the early learning stages.  I also need courage to start submitting jewelry designs to magazines, knowing full well that the process will involve some rejections along the way, with (hopefully) some acceptances.

jewelry pendant by Jenny Davies-Reazor

Courage Pendant

Unfortunately I’ve been sick for nearly 3 weeks now and after seeing my doctor yesterday, I’ve learned that I have bronchitis.  Now I know why I have been feeling so exhausted and lousy.  Which is to say that, while I’ve developed plans for this focal, I haven’t actually executed them yet.  So this will be a work-in-progress blog post.  I’ll share my plans with you and when I get this necklace finished, I’ll post an update here.

The focal has an old-fashioned, elegant antique vibe to it, so I immediately thought of a wonderful old bracelet that I picked up in an antique store about a year ago.

antique braceletJenny’s focal has two holes at the bottom of it, so I thought I would use them to attach the dangle  focal from the bracelet.

3aThe bracelet’s chain is unusually lovely and I want to incorporate some of it in the necklace, though I’m not yet certain how I will do so.

antique jewelry chainI plan to finish the necklace with small champagne colored pearls and faceted garnets.

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Want to see more gorgeous  jewelry with Jenny’s focals?  Here are all the links.  Have fun!

Guests:
Hope of Craftyhope
Sarajo of SJ Designs Jewelry

AJE team
Jennifer Cameron
Diana Ptaszynski
Lesley Watt
Susan Kennedy
Caroline Dewison
Linda Landig
Melissa Meman
Keirsten Giles
Rebekah Payne
Kristen Stevens
Jenny Davies-Reazor

I am always delighted to read your comments!   Hope to hear from you.

Linda

Linda Landig Jewelry – ArtFire 
Linda Landig Jewelry – Etsy

Spot On Bracelet

AJE Component of the Month Reveal

Once a month Art Jewelry Elements (AJE) hosts a component giveaway and jewelry reveal.  December’s component was made by the talented Rebekah Payne of Tree Wings Studio.  Members of the Art Jewelry Elements team, plus a few  lucky guest artists were given awesome polymer clay beads that Rebekah made for us.  I  love these.  They are so unique and I especially like that the sides of the beads look like they’d been roughly formed on a potter’s wheel

Goodies from Tree Wings Studio

Rebekah and I share a favorite color:  orange.  I am especially drawn to burnt orange and the colors of autumn.  Happily those are the colors of the bead she sent me, along with a sprinkling of white dots.  Those whimsical dots resulted in the name I chose for this piece, the Spot On Bracelet!

Spot On COM Bracelet

Spot On Bracelet

The flower beads have a Picasso finish and were perfect with Rebekah’s focal bead.  I like the way they add texture to the design.

Spot On COM Bracelet

Spot On Bracelet

Speaking of texture, the charcoal colored ceramic bead on the left and the green bead on the right are handmade by Mary Hubbard of White Clover Kiln.  Mary does a great job with surface textures on her beads and I love the way she achieves layers of color with her glazes.

Spot On COM Bracelet

Spot On Bracelet

The large round bead to the right of the focal is an enameled bead that I won in a giveaway from Barbara Lewis of Painting with Fire.  I’ve been experimenting with enamels a bit, but my beads don’t come out this nicely yet!  Maybe that will be happening in 2014!

Want to see more gorgeous  jewelry with Rebekah’s beads?  Here are all the links.  Have fun!

Guest Designers:

Stephanie – Confessions of a Bead Hoarder

Ann – Bead Love

Karin – Ginkgo et Coquelicot

Melissa – Bead Recipes

AJE Team:

Karen – Starry Road Studio

Diana – Suburban Girl Studio

Kristen – My Bead Journey

Lesley – The Gossiping Goddess

Jenny – Jenny Davies-Reazor

Linda – Linda’s Bead Blog & Meanderings

Melissa – Melissa Meman… Art, Life, Love

Susan – Sue Beads

Rebekah – Tree Wings Studio

Caroline – BlueberriBeads

I am always delighted to read your comments!   Hope to hear from you.

Linda

Linda Landig Jewelry – ArtFire 
Linda Landig Jewelry – Etsy